Indian Field Primitive Camping Area at Crowley Museum and Nature Center

Primitive camping at Indian Field Primitive Camping Area at Crowley Museum and Nature  Center near Sarasota, Florida is a wonderful way to observe wildlife at dawn and dusk.

Reservations are required. Tent/hammock camping only. This is a private facility requiring guided supervision provide by Not a Clue Adventures. They can be reached by calling 813-789-0904

There are 10 primitive sites at this facility. 4 sites have fire rings and 3 have picnic tables.

This campsite is named for Native Americans who settled here before us and is the site of an Indian village long gone. Each of the sites carries the name of one of the 15 original Timucua settlements known to exist at the time of early European expeditions.

The Timucua, composed of at least 15 separate tribes sharing a common language. More is known about the Saturiwa than any other Timucuan group. They were encountered by the French in 1562 and immortalized in the drawings of Jacques Le Moyne de Morgues. Each Timuicuan village had its own leader who was under the jurisdiction of a head chief who exacted tribute.

 

When European ships first landed on Florida in the 16th century, the area was well populated. Indians of the Timucua, Apalachee, Ais, Tekesta and Calusa were farming rich lands in the north — growing corn, beans and squash — and fishing or hunting for most of their food in the south.
Locations near reliable food sources with fresh water, comfortable microclimate and high, dry ground made good habitat for these Indians. Fresh and brackish bodies of water supplied steady sources of fish and shellfish, while fertile soils allowed farming to prosper

 

Pontano Site

Pontano Site

 

Pontano Site – Neighboring the Apalachee to the east were the Timucua, composed of at least 15 separate tribes sharing a common language. More is known about the Saturiwa than any other Timucuan group. They were encountered by the French in 1562 and immortalized in the drawings of Jacques Le Moyne de Morgues. Each Timuicuan village had its own leader who was under the jurisdiction of a head chief who exacted tribute.

 

 

Apalachee Site

Apalachee Site

 

Apalachee Site – One of the most powerful and influential native groups of Florida was the Apalachee. At the time Europeans began arriving in America, the Apalachee controlled the fertile area near the Tallahassee hills between the Ochlockonee and Aucilla rivers. The fertile clay and loam soils of the hills supported the heaviest, most concentrated aboriginal population in the state.

 

Ocale Site

Ocale Site

 

Ocale Site – The general name Timucuan was used by the Spaniards for all the native peoples who occupied north Florida east of the territory of the Apalachee. The Timucua were composed of a number of autonomous provinces that were hostile to one another at time when the first Europeans arrived. Among the important divisions in mission times were the Saltwater Timucua (Saturiwa and Mocamo), Fresh Water, Potano, Utina and Yustaga. The Saturiwa Indians used the name Timucua, spelled thimogna, to designate specfically the Utina Indians living between the St. Johns and the Suwannee rivers. In the early 17th century, Spaniards also used the name in this restrictive sense.
Calusa Site

Calusa Site

Calusa Site – Less is known about the early Indians of South Florida. The best known group is the Calusa, whose vast domain was ruled by a single chief. Although lacking agriculture, the Calusa developed elaborate political, social and trade networks. They were also expert wood carvers, and the many ceremonial items recovered from a Calusa site on Key Marco display great artistic skill. The Calusa lived around Charlotte Harbor just north of present-day Naples and around the mouth of the Caloosahatchie River in South Florida.

 

Tocobaga Site

Tocobaga Site

Tekesta Site

Tekesta Site

Campfire Circle

Campfire Circle

 

Jeaga Site

Jeaga Site

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jeaga Site – Arguably the most complex precontact culture in South Florida existed inland, in the Lake Okeechobee basin. These people not only had a sophisticated political and social organization, but they also grew corn. Striking similarities between their form of maize horticulture and that originating in the savannas of northern South America. This has led some scholars to suggest that ancient people of South American migrated north to South Florida through the Antilles islands of the Caribbean.

 

Ais Site

Ais Site

Acuera Site

Acuera Site

 

Saturiwa Site

Saturiwa Site

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Camping 101

CONCIERGE CAMPING WITH NOT A CLUE ADVENTURES
Camping newbie? In Camping 101 you will learn to camp from start to finish with Jeanene Arrrington. Not a Clue Adventures will provide all the gear (including tents but not sleeping bags), set up the campsite, supply and prepare meals, and take you on adventures.  $65.00 per night per adult $45.00 ages 6-12 (under 6 no charge). Private bookings are available for scouting, social groups and birthday parties! For dates prices and reservations information please contact us!  For more photos of the campground and events please visit: http://notaclueadventures.kodakgallery.com/gallery/personal-url/albumView.jsp?albumId=5641093790103#p/5974313990103

 

Crowley Museum and Nature Center has more to offer than camping!

 

Directions, Hours and Admission

Directions, Hours and Admission

***Google maps, Mapquest, and GPS directions are incorrect. Use directions below and please do not rely on these sources.*** ADDRESS 16405 Myakka Road, Sarasota, FL 34240 View Map From the south or west: Take Fruitville Road (exit #210 off I75) and drive 10 miles to the dead end. Turn right on Myakka road. Go 3 miles, Crowley is on your left. If you travel over the bridge to the north entrance of Myakka State Park, you missed us by a mile . Enjoy the park, and come on back by…. From the north: Take I75 to route #70, exit #217B, travel…

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Children’s Discovery Path

Children’s Discovery Path A 3/8 mile long path with five discovery stations where a child can stop and learn about animals, birds, and insects that are native to southwest Florida. Along this path, they will learn about eagles, bats, the gopher tortoise, spiders, and the Florida panther. Each station has a fun, hands-on activity where path explorers can jump, climb, see, and feel what it is like to be one of these creatures. CDP Video Click Here INFORMATION COST: Discovery Path – self guided $3 per child aged 5-12 No charge…

 

Museum and Pioneer Area

THE MUSEUM Our pioneer museum exhibits a variety of historic objects, mostly from the Crowley family and the Old Miakka area. The museum is partially arranged like a general store, such as the one John Crowley and his son Jim had kept. A cowboy photography exhibit by well-known area photographer Jimmy Peters is also in the museum. Click here to visit Jimmy’s website and see more amazing photos… THE PIONEER CABIN The one room cabin is typical of those built by pioneers when they first arrived to an unsettled area and contains…

 

Nature Trails and Boardwalks

Nature Trails and Boardwalks

NATURE TRAILS The self-guided nature trail winds through the Crowley property from high and dry pine flatwoods, through the shady oak hammock, over the Maple Branch swamp, and out to the edge of the expansive Tatum Sawgrass Marsh along the Myakka River. The wide trails offer easy and pleasant walking conditions that are enjoyed by people of all ages and abilities. Visitors are provided with a booklet for the self-guided trail that details much of the native flora and fauna that might be seen. Below are the main parts of the trail that…

 

Our Founders

Our Founders

William Jasper Crowley & Edina Truchot Crowley Museum and Nature Center is a 501(c)3 community organization founded by Jasper Crowley (1900-1976) and Edina Truchot (1899-1976) in 1974.  John Crowley, Jasper’s grandfather, was an Irish immigrant who came to this area from Pennsylvania. He was a farmer and a blacksmith, a sawmill owner and his wife Sylvia was a teacher. He moved to Florida hoping to improve the health of his wife and daughter. In 1884, John applied for a homestead on 160 acres near Stickney Point in Sarasota. The…

 

Mission Statement

Our Vision: To be the best steward of southwest Florida natural and cultural history. Our Mission: To facilitate the enjoyment and understanding of Southwest Florida nature and history, to foster responsible stewardship, and to promote environmental awareness. Our Core Values: Environmental stewardship, conservation, and preservation Cultural heritage preservation Furtherance of sustainable agriculture practices Service to our community Service with integrity and honesty Education through experiential learning Synergistic opportunities with…

 

Pets at Crowley

At Crowley we respect and admire all animals, wild and domestic. Considering that our site is just under 200 acres we have wonderful diversity of wildlife and plants. Much of our property is wetlands adjacent to the river and Crowley Creek. This creates a sanctuary and breeding ground for many elusive and rare species.  The park is closed three days out of the week to allow the animals to express natural behavior and this makes it more likely to observe them on the days we are open. Also, the Crowley Farm surrounding the museum area…

 

The Tatum-Rawls house

The Tatum-Rawls house

The 1889 Tatum-Rawls House at Crowley Natural & Cultural History Center is one of the oldest examples of pioneer Florida architecture still standing in Sarasota County. The building is a record of southwest Florida’s rural history. The Center’s volunteers have helped restore this beautiful representation of a early Florida homestead.